History

With their tall steeples, New England’s picturesque churches dominate town centers; their presence is a testament to the importance of church to the life of the early settlers and to ours today. Our church is quintessentially New England, with roots in the First Church, established in Concord by the earliest settlers in 1636.

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Church in 1826

In 1826, a small group broke away from the First Church to confirm their belief in the Trinity and to establish our church. From the beginning, the church was involved in the issues of the times. Within 10 years, formal resolutions stated the congregation’s “solid stance against slavery” and members were actively involved in providing assistance to run-away slaves. Today we continue the tradition of compassionate concern through our strong commitment to mission and outreach.

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Church in 1898

The original meeting house was extensively renovated in 1898, resulting in a Victorian structure with a corner steeple and stained glass windows. In 1924, that church building was leveled in a devastating fire. The congregation celebrated its 100th anniversary as a new church building rose from the ashes.

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Church in 1927

A growing Church School population necessitated the addition of a church school wing in 1956 and in 2001, a major renovation and expansion was completed to make our facility fully accessible and to accommodate the many functions and activities of our busy parish.

Below is an image of The Constitution of the Second Congregational Society (later TriCon).

constitution


During Rev. Dr. John Lombard’s tenure, the church has successfully undertaken four capital campaigns to renovate, repair, and make fully accessible the primary areas of the church, address issues of environmental conservation and sustainability, secure long-term clergy housing resources, purchase and install a new pipe organ, and establish a mission endowment fund to supplement TriCon’s extraordinary commitment to mission and outreach of over 25% of the church’s total monies annually.